Closed petition Teach Britain's colonial past as part of the UK's compulsory curriculum

Currently, it is not compulsory for primary or secondary school students to be educated on Britain's role in colonisation, or the transatlantic slave trade. We petition the government to make education on topics such as these compulsory, with the ultimate aim of a far more inclusive curriculum.

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Now, more than ever, we must turn to education and history to guide us. But vital information has been withheld from the people by institutions meant to educate them. By educating on the events of the past, we can forge a better future. Colonial powers must own up to their pasts by raising awareness of the forced labour of Black people, past and present mistreatment of BAME people, and most importantly, how this contributes to the unfair systems of power at the foundation of our modern society.

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Government responded

This response was given on 30 July 2020

The history curriculum at Key Stage 3 includes the statutory theme “ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain 1745-1901”. Topics within statutory themes are chosen by schools and teachers.

Read the response in full

Within the history curriculum there is already a statutory theme at Key Stage 3 titled “ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901”, as such we do not believe there is a need to take this action as the option to teach this topic exists within this compulsory theme. The history curriculum gives teachers and schools the freedom and flexibility to use specific examples from history to teach pupils about the history of Britain and the wider world at all stages. It is for schools and teachers themselves to determine which examples, topics and resources to use to stimulate and challenge pupils and reflect key points in history.

There are opportunities within the themes and eras of the history curriculum for teachers and schools to teach about Britain's role in colonisation and the transatlantic slave trade.

The full curriculum is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study

We have drawn out below both statutory and non-statutory examples of themes in the curriculum where these topics could be taught.

Key Stage 1: Events within or beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally; and the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.

Key Stage 2: A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

Key Stage 3: Within the theme ‘the development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509’, examples given include the Norman Conquest, and the English campaigns to conquer Wales and Scotland up to 1314;

Within the theme ‘the development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745’, examples given include the first colony in America and first contact with India;

Within the theme ‘ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain 1745-1901’, examples given include Britain’s transatlantic slave trade, including its effects and its eventual abolition, the development of the British Empire with a depth study (for example, of India), and Ireland and Home Rule;

Within the theme ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’, examples include the two world wars, Indian independence and end of Empire, social, cultural and technological change in post-war British society, and Britain’s place in the world since 1945;

Within ‘the study of an aspect or theme in British history that consolidates and extends pupils’ chronological knowledge from before 1066’, examples include study of an aspect of social history, such as the impact through time of the migration of people to, from and within the British Isles; and at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. Examples given include Mughal India 1526-1857, China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911, changing Russian empires c.1800-1989, and the United States in the 20th century.

In addition, the local history study element within each key stage offers opportunities to teach about these areas. They are also within the scope of the subject content set out for GCSE History.

Department for Education

This is a revised response. The Petitions Committee requested a response which more directly addressed the request of the petition. You can find the original response towards the bottom of the petition page (https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/324092)

Other parliamentary business

Original Government response

The history curriculum at Key Stage 3 includes the statutory theme “ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901”. Topics within statutory themes are chosen by schools and teachers.

Within the history curriculum there is already a statutory theme at Key Stage 3 titled “ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901”. The history curriculum gives teachers and schools the freedom and flexibility to use specific examples from history to teach pupils about the history of Britain and the wider world at all stages. It is for schools and teachers themselves to determine which examples, topics and resources to use to stimulate and challenge pupils and reflect key points in history.

There are opportunities within the themes and eras of the history curriculum for teachers and schools to teach about Britain's role in colonisation and the transatlantic slave trade.

The full curriculum is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study

We have drawn out below both statutory and non-statutory examples of themes in the curriculum where these topics could be taught.

Key Stage 1:
Events within or beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally; and the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.

Key Stage 2:
A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

Key Stage 3:
Within the theme ‘the development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509’, examples given include the Norman Conquest, and the English campaigns to conquer Wales and Scotland up to 1314;

Within the theme ‘the development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745’, examples given include the first colony in America and first contact with India;

Within the theme ‘ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain 1745-1901’, examples given include Britain’s transatlantic slave trade, including its effects and its eventual abolition, the development of the British Empire with a depth study (for example, of India), and Ireland and Home Rule;

Within the theme ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’, examples include the two world wars, Indian independence and end of Empire, social, cultural and technological change in post-war British society, and Britain’s place in the world since 1945;

Within ‘the study of an aspect or theme in British history that consolidates and extends pupils’ chronological knowledge from before 1066’, examples include study of an aspect of social history, such as the impact through time of the migration of people to, from and within the British Isles; and at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. Examples given include Mughal India 1526-1857, China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911, changing Russian empires c.1800-1989, and the United States in the 20th century.

In addition, the local history study element within each key stage offers opportunities to teach about these areas. They are also within the scope of the subject content set out for GCSE History.

Department for Education

This response was given on 26 June 2020. The Petitions Committee then requested a revised response, that more directly addressed the request of the petition.

MPs to debate Black History Month in the House of Commons

MPs will debate Black History Month on Tuesday 20 October in the main House of Commons Chamber. The subject of the debate has been determined by the Backbench Business Committee.

This will be a general debate. General debates allow MPs to debate important issues, however they do not end in a vote nor can they change the law.

The debate will start sometime after midday. The exact start time will depend on how quickly the previous business, legislation on Non-Domestic Ratings, is completed.

You can watch the debate live, or replay it later on Tuesday on this link: https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/6d7a2177-2518-4174-a0ba-c311a6fa9488

Find out more about how Parliamentary debates work: https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/debates/
Find out more about the Backbench Business Committee: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/202/backbench-business-committee/

MPs to examine Black history and cultural diversity in the curriculum

The Petitions Committee (the group of MPs who oversee petition.parliament.uk) will hear from petition creators and other campaigners and experts in an 'evidence session' on Black history and cultural diversity. This session is the result of the petition you signed and others calling for changes to the curriculum which have received hundreds of thousands of signatures.

The Petitions Committee will be working with the Women and Equalities Committee and MPs from the Education Committee.

Find out more about the session: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/news/120411/petitions-committee-announces-joint-evidence-session-on-black-history-and-cultural-diversity-in-the-curriculum/

Watch the session live at 2.30pm on Thursday 5 November: https://youtu.be/WjwNciEYe9s

When will this petition be debated?

Once the Petitions Committee has finished its work on this issue, it will schedule this petition for a debate. We’ll let you know when that happens. The work it is doing will help inform that debate.

What is the Petitions Committee?

The Petitions Committee is a cross-party group of MPs that considers e-petitions submitted on Parliament’s petitions website and public (paper) petitions presented to the House of Commons. It is independent of the Government.
You can get updates on their work by following the Committee on Twitter @HoCpetitions or on their website: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/
Find out more about how petitions work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGEOraE08Jk&feature=youtu.be

Find out more about the Women and Equalities Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/328/women-and-equalities-committee/

Find out more about the Education Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/203/education-committee/

These are ‘select committees’. Find out how Select Committees work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_2RDuDs44c

MPs take further evidence on Black history and cultural diversity in the curriculum

On Wednesday 18 November, the Petitions Committee and Women and Equalities Committee heard further evidence on Black history and cultural diversity in the national curriculum.

Watch the session: https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/1901748e-fd28-4a57-b669-902b12cbd38f
A transcript will be published in due course.

The committees took evidence from a range of academics and educational experts including Dr Marlon Moncrieffe of the University of Brighton, Professor Claire Alexander, University of Manchester, Dr Christine Callender, of UCL Institute of Education, and Allana Gay, co-founder of the BAMEed Network.

This session follows the first joint evidence session on 5 November, where the committees heard from petitioners, experts and academics on the need for change.

Follow the Committee for real-time updates on its work: https://www.twitter.com/hocpetitions
Find out more: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/news/131901/committee-announces-second-joint-evidence-session-on-black-history-and-cultural-diversity-in-the-curriculum/

When will this petition be debated?

Once the Petitions Committee has finished its work on this issue, it will schedule this petition for a debate. We’ll let you know when that happens. The work it is doing will help inform that debate.

What is the Petitions Committee?

The Petitions Committee is a cross-party group of MPs that considers e-petitions submitted on Parliament’s petitions website and public (paper) petitions presented to the House of Commons. It is independent of the Government.

You can get updates on their work on their website: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/

Find out more about how petitions work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGEOraE08Jk&feature=youtu.be

Find out more about the Women and Equalities Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/328/women-and-equalities-committee/

Find out more about the Education Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/203/education-committee/

These are ‘select committees’. Find out how Select Committees work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_2RDuDs44c

Share your views on ethnic disparities and inequality in the UK

The Government has launched a consultation on ethnic disparities and inequality in the UK, and want to hear from members of the public. There are ten questions, and you can answer any or all of them.

One of the questions is: How should the school curriculum adapt in response to the ethnic diversity of the country?

You can find out more about the consultation and contribute here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/ethnic-disparities-and-inequality-in-the-uk-call-for-evidence/ethnic-disparities-and-inequality-in-the-uk-call-for-evidence

The closing date for responses is Monday 30 November 2020.

The Petitions Committee has been working jointly with the Women and Equalities Committee to look into Black history and cultural diversity in the curriculum. You can find out more about their work so far, watch the evidence sessions, and read the transcripts here:

https://committees.parliament.uk/work/739/black-history-and-cultural-diversity-in-the-curriculum/

When will this petition be debated?

Once the Petitions Committee has finished its work on this issue, it will schedule this petition for a debate. We’ll let you know when that happens. The work it is doing will help inform that debate.

What is the Petitions Committee?

The Petitions Committee is a cross-party group of MPs that considers e-petitions submitted on Parliament’s petitions website and public (paper) petitions presented to the House of Commons. It is independent of the Government.

Find out more about the Committee: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/

Get real-time updates on the Committee's work by following them on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/HoCPetitions

Find out more about how petitions work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGEOraE08Jk&feature=youtu.be

Find out more about the Women and Equalities Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/328/women-and-equalities-committee/

Find out more about the Education Committee:
https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/203/education-committee/

These are ‘select committees’. Find out how Select Committees work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_2RDuDs44c

MPs to question Education Minister Nick Gibb on Black history & cultural diversity in the curriculum

On Thursday 25 February, the Petitions Committee and Women and Equalities Committee will question Education Minister Rt Hon Nick Gibb MP on Black history and cultural diversity in the national curriculum, after hundreds of thousands of people signed petitions on this issue including this one. A Member of the Education Committee will also attend the session. Andrew McCully, Director General for Early Years and Schools Group, Department for Education, will also give evidence.

Watch live from 2.30pm on Thurs 25 Feb: https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/cc5888c2-c99e-475f-b8ad-1d0d9597651c

Find out more, including comments from Petitions Committee Chair Catherine McKinnell: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/news/144690/committees-to-question-government-minister-on-black-history-and-cultural-diversity-in-the-curriculum/

Ahead of the session, the Committees surveyed petitioners, teachers and other education staff to find out their views on this issue. Thanks to everyone who took part.

Read a summary of what you told us: https://committees.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/23085/default/

Find out more

Follow the Petitions Committee on Twitter for real-time updates on its work on this and other issues: https://www.twitter.com/hocpetitions

Follow the Women and Equalities Committee on Twitter for real-time updates on its work on this and other issues: https://www.twitter.com/commonswomequ

MPs write to the Government for more information following recent evidence session on Black history

On 9 March, Petitions Committee Chair Catherine McKinnell and Women and Equalities Committee Chair Caroline Nokes wrote to Education Minister Nick Gibb to ask for further information on several of the answers he gave to the Committees on the issue of Black history and cultural diversity in the curriculum.

Read the letter: https://committees.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/23571/default/

The two Committees questioned Mr Gibb on 25 February on evidence they had taken from petitioners, campaigners, historians and educators in response to several well-supported petitions calling for the curriculum to be diversified and decolonised, including the petition you signed.

Watch the evidence session: https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/cc5888c2-c99e-475f-b8ad-1d0d9597651c
Read the transcript: https://committees.parliament.uk/oralevidence/1746/default/

Find out more

Find out more about the role of the Petitions Committee: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/326/petitions-committee/role/

Follow the Petitions Committee for real-time updates on its work: https://www.twitter.com/hocpetitions

Find out more about the Women and Equalities Committee: https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/328/women-and-equalities-committee/

Follow the Women and Equalities Committee for real-time updates on its work: https://www.twitter.com/commonswomequ

Ministerial statement on the report of the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities

On Tuesday 20 April, the Minister for Equalities Kemi Badenoch MP gave a statement to the House of Commons on the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities.

The statement follows the Government's publication of the report of the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-report-of-the-commission-on-race-and-ethnic-disparities

Watch the statement here: https://parliamentlive.tv/event/index/b586787a-eb7f-409b-b20e-9cb31d21ddd0?in=13:38:40

Read the transcript here: https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2021-04-20/debates/1502466F-D06B-402A-B7C0-03452FFB1DA9/CommissionOnRaceAndEthnicDisparities

Ministerial statements are a way for Ministers to bring an important matter to the attention of the House. Find out more about them here: https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/statements/

What did the report say about the curriculum?

The Commission considered the extent to which children acquire a proper grounding in the national story, including its multi-ethnic character, and recommended that the Department for Education work with an appointed panel of independent experts to produce a well-sequenced set of teaching resources to tell the multiple, nuanced stories that have shaped the country we live in today.

Read the report's section on teaching an inclusive curriculum here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-report-of-the-commission-on-race-and-ethnic-disparities/education-and-training#making-of-modern-britain-teaching-an-inclusive-curriculum

What is the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities?

The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities (CRED) has been set up by the Government to review inequality in the UK, focusing on areas including poverty, education, employment, health and the criminal justice system. The Commission, which is independent of the Government, will look at outcomes for the whole population.

Find out more about the Commission here: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/commission-on-race-and-ethnic-disparities

Government responds to request for more information on its work on diversity in the curriculum

The Petitions Committee have published a response from Minister for School Standards Nick Gibb MP to a joint letter from the Petitions and Women and Equalities Committees, which asked for further information on a range of issues relating to Black history and cultural diversity in the national curriculum.

Read the Government's response: https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/5675/documents/55882/default/
Read the Petitions Committee’s letter: https://committees.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/23571/default/

In his response, Mr Gibb outlines the Government’s plans for improving support for teachers’ curriculum planning, teacher training reform, anti-bullying work, and commits to considering the recommendations from the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities.

What is the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities?

The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities has been set up by the Government to review inequality in the UK, focusing on areas including poverty, education, employment, health and the criminal justice system. The Commission will look at outcomes for the whole population.